New York unlicensed street vendor fines, traders in the movement

The law has fallen on the sidewalks of street vendors in New York City. As soon as the city came out of the Corona epidemic, these traders were being fined large sums of money. All their goods are being confiscated including fines from unlicensed traders. The traders have also started a movement in protest of such activities in the city.

Most of these sidewalk traders are immigrants. A large number of Bangladeshis have also been running such small businesses on the sidewalks of New York.

New York City vendors are licensed to do business on the sidewalk. The city law stipulates a maximum of 635 licenses. For this reason, new traders cannot apply for a vendor license. Those who already have a license are running this business by changing ownership. However, in addition to the license, with the help of local people, many businesses have developed on the sidewalks of the city.

New York City’s ‘street food’ is one of the attractions not only for city dwellers but also for tourists. These roadside shops are crowded with fast food at low prices. In some cases, these roadside businesses are open for 18 hours a day.

Recently, these street vendors have been closely monitored. All the goods are being taken away if the license cannot be shown during the search. These migrants are in dire straits due to the economic crisis caused by the Corona epidemic. They have also started a movement in protest of such activities in the city.

Street vendors protest in the area adjacent to Corona Park in Jackson Heights on June 18. These street traders have formed an organization called Street Band Project. At the protest rally, the group’s leader, Kerina Guterres, said New York City would be even more brutal. Where there is no opportunity to apply for a license, the city cannot impose a fine of one thousand dollars for not having a license, he noted.

Some state lawmakers, including state Senator Jessica Ramos, have sided with these businessmen. Jessica Ramos has also proposed a law in the state legislature. Jessica Ramos says those who want to survive by working honestly in this city must ensure the opportunity to do so without fear.

Assemblyman Gonzalez Rajos said such injustice could not be tolerated against people who risked their lives to keep the city going. He said the city’s attempt to show disrespect to these hardworking people was not right.

“We’re not going anywhere,” said Alex Julien, a local street vendor who attended the protest rally. I am working hard and living a hard life in the city. We will continue to fight. ”

Fakhrul Islam, a Bangladeshi businessman present at the rally, said he had tried for the last 10 years but could not get a vendor license himself. Having to do business by renting more licenses made by others. In a country like the United States, the injustice of the city’s fines on hardworking people must be stopped immediately. Jessica Ramos says those who want to survive by working honestly in this city must ensure the opportunity to do so without fear.

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