Sacco coconut milk is declining on the monkey labor charge

The target is the latest major U.S. Retailer Sacco to stop selling coconut milk following allegations by its manufacturer The monkey uses labor.

In a statement on Monday, Betta dropped the retailer product because an investigation by a non-profit organization found that the Thai-based Teppungborn Coconut Company was “exploiting monkeys and lying about it”.

The target joins Costco, where Paul dropped out in October.

U.S. target Sacco stops selling coconut milk.
U.S. target Sacco stops selling coconut milk. (Martin Lee / Shutterstock)

Betta’s investigation found that the monkeys were forced to pick up coconuts and perform for tourists, and that they were “tied up, tied to old tires, or caged larger than their bodies”.

Some companies have changed their practices, while others hide monkeys when auditors come to check on the animals.

Target told CNN Business that “we take the claims against Sacco seriously and we decided to remove their products from our assortment in November 2020 because they could not adequately address the concerns they raised.”

A working monkey rides in the back of a pickup truck on his way to a coconut plantation in the southern Thai province of Champaign.
A working monkey rides in the back of a pickup truck on his way to a coconut plantation in the southern Thai province of Champaign. (Abi)

Sacco, one of the world leaders in the production of coconut milk and other coconut products, and the Teppungborn Coconut Company did not immediately respond to CNN comment.

But The company told USA Today It has audited coconut plantations using third parties and “does not see the use of monkeys for coconut harvesting.”

Betta said it would target 26,000 stores, including Wakemans, Food Lion, and Stop & Shop.

It now focuses on Publics, Groger and Albertsons, which continue to sell Sacco products.

Publix told CNN Business that the company had reviewed third-party audits and confirmed that the US ambassador to Thailand had monkeys “not used in the commercial harvest of coconuts”.

Requests for comment by Groger and Albertson were not sent immediately.

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